Water coloring with Tombow

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tombow, lettering blog, water color

Oh water coloring…do you love it or dislike it? For me it is very tricky to learn. I’ve attempted SO many times and even had my super talented calligra-bestie teach me her ways and I still have issues. Too much water, not enough water, etc. It is hard! My brain just doesn’t seem to get it. BUT! Give me some Tombow Dual Brush Pens and a water or paint brush, and I am golden. I LOVE the ease of water coloring these pens give. Since the Dual Brush Pens are water based, you can add water to them to create some pretty spectacular water color lettering AND illustrations!

Today I’m going to show you two different ways you can water color using the Dual Brush Pens. You’'ll need the following materials: Tombow Dual Brush Pens 192, 249, 243, 245, 373, and 555. I’ll also use the Tombow Fudenosuke Hard Tip Pen, Tombow Monotwin Permanent Marker, Tombow Blending Palette and a water or paint brush. I’ll be using Canson’s Watercolor Paper as well. Let’s get to it!

LETTERING

For the lettering piece, I chose the following blue/green color palette: 243, 245, 373, and 555. You of course can choose any color palette you’d like, like pinks and purple or yellow and orange. Just have fun creating!

Start by using 243 and letter out your word on the watercolor paper. You want the base of your word to be the lightest color.

tombow, water color, lettering

Next using 245, add this color to all your letters from left to right about 1/3 to halfway down.

ACS_0246.JPG

Next, using 373 add color underneath the 245 from left to right, leaving enough room at the bottom for the last color.

tombow, watercolor, lettering

Now using 555. fill in the rest of your letters at the bottom. Don’t worry about your lines being perfectly straight, we can fix that in just a bit!

tombow, watercolor, lettering

Now that we have added all our color, we can blend with water. I’m using a water brush with an extra fine tip, but if you don’t have one you can use a small paint or watercolor brush. Start with your first letter and blend the 245 color up to fill the tops of your letters. This is a preference thing, you can certainly start blending from the top all the way down, but I wanted to add a little of the darker color to the top.

tombow, watercolor, lettering

Next, blend the colors of your letter by “painting” down to the bottom. Then repeat for each letter.

tombow, watercolor, lettering
tombow, watercolor, lettering

When your lettering dries, you’ll be able to see any spots that need fixing. The descender on my g was a little wonky, so I went back over the outside lines with my water brush to fix that.

tombow, watercolor, lettering
tombow, watercolor, lettering
tombow, watercolor, lettering

And your watercolor piece is finished! I love this color combination and how the green transitions into the blue. So pretty! If your lines on your letters still bother you and you don’t like the look, you can add some extra dimension by using the Tombow Fudenosuke Hard Tip Pen and tracing all your outside lines, then add a thicker shadow to all your down strokes.

tombow, watercolor, lettering

ILLUSTRATIONS

Using Tombow Dual Brush Pens as watercolors is not just for lettering. You can certainly use them to color in illustrations. Let me show you a different technique to achieve a watercolor leaf. For this you’ll need Dual Brush Pens 249 and 192, the Monotwin Permanent Marker and the Blending Palette.

First, sketch out your leaf using the Monotwin Permanent Marker. This marker is waterproof which makes it the perfect option to outline your illustration.

tombow, watercolor, lettering blog

Next, scribble ink from 192 and 249 onto your blending palette.

tombow, watercolor, lettering blog

Using a small tipped paint brush, dip it in water and then pick up the ink from 192 from the Blending Palette. Then paint that color into your leaf.

tombow, watercolor, lettering
tombow, watercolor, lettering blog

Next, rinse your paint brush, then use it to pick up the ink from 249 from the Blending Palette. Then add the darker color to the bottom of your leaf to give it some depth. You can also follow the veins of the leaf with the darker color. Then blend in both colors with your brush. If your brush runs dry, just add a little bit more water to it.

tombow, watercolor, lettering blog
tombow, watercolor, lettering blog
tombow, watercolor, lettering blog
tombow, watercolor, lettering blog
tombow, watercolor, lettering blog

And your leaf is complete! Wasn’t that so easy and less messy?! There are so many possibilities with all 96 Dual Brush Pen colors and using them for illustrations! The fun part is experimenting and seeing what color combinations you can come up.

If you would like more practice with watercolor and getting creative with different color combinations, I have a FREE Fall Leaves worksheet for November you can print out. Simply feed an 8.5”x11” piece of watercolor paper through your printer and then pick out some fun autumn colors to try out and fill in the leaves. You can find the worksheet here (worksheets are for PERSONAL use only):

If you try out this technique be sure to tag me on IG and use the hashtag #aheartenedcalling so I can follow along!

I hope you had fun learning how to watercolor with Tombow Dual Brush Pens! It’s my favorite way to watercolor!

Happy Lettering and till next time,

Mandy


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